Plantain Spice Bread, Grain, Egg, and Nut-free

My plantain spice bread is a delicious treat that is appropriate for all biotypes. I love working with plantains, alternative flours, and spices because of how complex the tongue lingering flavor profiles can be. If you’ve never tried grain-free flours, I encourage you to give my plantain spice bread a try. They are fun to work with and taste just as delicious as grain-based flours.

Valentine’s Day is next week, but the flavors in this bread will make you absolutely fall in love all year long. Top with melted ghee and raw honey for a real treat. Happy bread making!

Yield: 1 loaf

Plantain Spice Bread Ingredients:
  • 2 ripe plantains, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 1/3 cup room temperature ghee
  • 1 tablespoon unflavored gelatin
  • 1/2 cup tigernut flour*
  • 1/4 cup cassava flour
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground unrefined salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon lemon juice
Plantain Spice Bread Instructions:
  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  • In a food processor fitted with a metal blade, process the plantains, ghee and gelatin until the mixture is completely smooth.
  • Pour the mixture into a medium mixing bowl.
  • Stir in the remaining ingredients and mix well.
  • Let the batter set for 2 minutes so that it’s slightly firm.
  • Line a 9×4 bread pan with parchment paper (you may want to crumple it first to make it more pliable).
  • Spoon the batter into the pan and smooth with an offset spatula.
  • Bake for 45-50 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean.
  • Let the bread cool completely on a cooling rack.
  • Pull the bread and parchment out and slice.
  • The bread will keep at room temperature for 3 days in a paper bag, or frozen (allow to cool completely first) for 1 month.

*Tiger nuts are actually little tubers, not nuts. My secret to silky flour is to process sliced nuts in a handheld grinder for three seconds. I don’t recommend store bought tiger nut flour because it’s way too gritty and creates an odd texture in baked goods. Sliced tiger nuts can be purchased on Amazon.

As always, let me know how it turns out for you in the comments below!

Love,
SamiSig

Comments 3

  1. Samantha, are you successfully treating your Undermethylation / Histadelia with a specific kind of low-folate diet, or are you also on the same protocol as the rest of us: methionine, calcium, B6, etc? Your entire website makes it seem like you’re treating your disease with diet alone, and not supplements. If so, that is remarkable and should be reported to the orthomolecular journals and websites!

    1. Post
      Author

      I do maintain a low-folate, high protein diet, but I also take nutrients. Diet and nutrients work in synergy with one another.

  2. I’d love to try this bread and have whole tiger nuts. Would these damage my blendtec or would I have to buy sliced ones ?( I already ruined my jar with very hard parmesan cheese once before)

    Also I don’t have cassava flour…are there alternatives i can use?

    Your recipes sound amazing..I’d like to try them all!

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